Quantcast Figure 3-19.Characteristic curve for an SCR

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
3-22 Figure 3-19.—Characteristic curve for an SCR. The effect of a gate signal on the firing of an SCR is shown in figure 3-20. Breakdown of the center junction can be achieved at speeds approaching a microsecond by applying an appropriate signal to the gate lead, while holding the anode voltage constant. After breakdown, the voltage across the device is so low that the current through it from cathode to anode is essentially determined by the load it is feeding. Figure 3-20.—SCR characteristic curve with various gate signals. The important thing to remember is that a small current from gate to cathode can fire or trigger the SCR, changing it from practically an open circuit to a short circuit. The only way to change it back again (to commutate it) is to reduce the load current to a value less than the minimum forward-bias current. Gate current is required only until the anode current has completely built up to a point sufficient to sustain


Electrical News
Analysts Cool on Intel/Altera Combo
Analysts gave a chilly reception to the idea of Intel...
eetimes.com
Why MediaTek Pushes Cross-Device Sharing Scheme
MediaTek is creating a technology, called CrossMount, that will link...
eetimes.com
OFC: Facebook Engineer Wants Silicon Photonics Now
At the annual panel session for editors and analysts, an...
eetimes.com
5 Don'ts and Do's for Working with a Contract Manufacturer
Heeding these ten tips can prevent headaches when using contract...
eetimes.com
ESC Silicon Valley 2015 Sneak Peek! Using Arduinos & ChipKITs for Rapid Prototyping
At ESC Silicon Valley 2015, Duane Benson will be giving...
eetimes.com
IoT Should Wait for Standards
It's too early to start setting standards for the Internet...
eetimes.com
Researchers Claim 44x Power Cuts
Researchers at the University of Illinois invented the worlds first...
eetimes.com
How Will Deep Learning Change SoCs?
Deep learning is changing the way computers see, hear and...
eetimes.com
EEVblog #728 – T4 LED Lighting
A quick rant on T4 fluorescent tubes, and a small...
eevblog.com
Integre Brings x1 HyperLink DSP to FPGA
Integre's IP core allows a user-defined system to communicate with...
eetimes.com
SanDisk Goes For Big Data Flash Market
InfiniFlash storage platform puts company in competition with customers and...
eetimes.com
March 28 is Arduino Day -- Break Out the Party Hats!
On 3/28/2015, the folks at SparkFun are offering up to...
eetimes.com
Four Steps to Field-Oriented Control -- The Final Two
Concluding Dave's series on implementing field-oriented control, he looks at...
eetimes.com
Why We Disagree with the IEEE's Patent Policy
The IEEE's new patent policy could slash royalty revenues and...
eetimes.com
Linux Seeks Security, Unity
Linux needs greater security, unity and interoperability to meet its...
eetimes.com
Friday Quiz: EE 101, Part 3
In this third installment from "Electrical Engineering 101," we look...
eetimes.com
Robotic Bacteria Senses Humidity
A bacterial spore studded with graphene quantum dots makes the...
eetimes.com
Teensy-Weensy GPAK4 Mixed Signal FPGAs
For embedded designers who aren't familiar with FPGAs, Silego's teensy-weensy...
eetimes.com
Toughening Up LPDDR4 and Parallel NOR Flash For Automotive
Ignoring the consumer market for now, Micron has introduced its...
eetimes.com
Vehicle Reliability Is Up, Especially in Powertrain
Some cars are more reliable than others, but even the...
eetimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +