Quantcast TYPES OF NUMBER SYSTEMS

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
1-2 BACKGROUND AND HISTORY Man’s earliest number or counting system was probably developed to help determine how many possessions a person had. As daily activities became more complex, numbers became more important in trade, time, distance, and all other phases of human life. As you have seen already, numbers are extremely important in your military and personal life. You realize that you need more than your fingers and toes to keep track of the numbers in your daily routine. Ever since people discovered that it was necessary to count objects, they have been looking for easier ways to count them. The abacus, developed by the Chinese, is one of the earliest known calculators. It is still in use in some parts of the world. Blaise Pascal (French) invented the first adding machine in 1642. Twenty years later, an Englishman, Sir Samuel Moreland, developed a more compact device that could multiply, add, and subtract. About 1672, Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (German) perfected a machine that could perform all the basic operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide), as well as extract the square root. Modern electronic digital computers still use von Liebniz's principles. MODERN USE Computers are now employed wherever repeated calculations or the processing of huge amounts of data is needed. The greatest applications are found in the military, scientific, and commercial fields. They have applications that range from mail sorting, through engineering design, to the identification and destruction of enemy targets. The advantages of digital computers include speed, accuracy, and man- power savings. Often computers are able to take over routine jobs and release personnel for more important workwork that cannot be handled by a computer. People and computers do not normally speak the same language. Methods of translating information into forms that are understandable and usable to both are necessary. Humans generally speak in words and numbers expressed in the decimal number system, while computers only understand coded electronic pulses that represent digital information. In this chapter you will learn about number systems in general and about binary, octal, and hexadecimal (which we will refer to as hex) number systems specifically. Methods for converting numbers in the binary, octal, and hex systems to equivalent numbers in the decimal system (and vice versa) will also be described. You will see that these number systems can be easily converted to the electronic signals necessary for digital equipment. TYPES OF NUMBER SYSTEMS Until now, you have probably used only one number system, the decimal system. You may also be familiar with the Roman numeral system, even though you seldom use it. THE DECIMAL NUMBER SYSTEM In this module you will be studying modern number systems. You should realize that these systems have certain things in common. These common terms will be defined using the decimal system as our base. Each term will be related to each number system as that number system is introduced.


Electrical News
Apple Ticks Up Sales Record
Apple reported record sales for its second quarter but said...
eetimes.com
5G Makes Waves for Asia Giants
The recent 5G Forum USA, held in Palo Alto, Calif.,...
eetimes.com
The Basics of the CE Marking, Continued
Products that fall under a CE marking Directive cannot be...
eetimes.com
EEVblog #737 – World’s Biggest Collection Of Electronics Components
Dave uncovers that has to be one of the world’s...
eevblog.com
ARM Gives Peek at Road Map
ARM disclosed new details of its A72, including three functional...
eetimes.com
Cypress Expands Error Correcting Code For SRAM
As overall SRAM market shrinks, Cypress sees uptick in automotive,...
eetimes.com
EUV Deal Raises Questions
ASML announced it struck a deal to sell 15 EUV...
eetimes.com
Make Field-oriented Motor Control Affordable
Shaft sensors and their wiring make field-oriented motor control pricey,...
eetimes.com
Why Connect Cars?
EE Times will host a radio show on "Why Connect...
eetimes.com
Time Flies Like an Arrow & Fruit Flies Like Bananas
Using a computer to translate something like a technical article...
eetimes.com
NXP-Freescale Mega Merger on Track
Five companies, aside from NXP, were in talks with Freescale,...
eetimes.com
Basic University Research Key to Industry Progress
A basic, precompetitive research base is required to continue to...
eetimes.com
MEMS Seeks its Moore's Law
MEMS provide an alternative route to scaling technology beyond Moore's...
eetimes.com
Wireless Charging Gets Universal Antenna
NuCurrent believe the company's 50 patents in areas such as...
eetimes.com
Friday Quiz: EMI and EMC
EDN's Designer's Guide to Electromagnetic Compatibility, written by Bill Kimmel...
eetimes.com
EEVBlog #736 – World’s First IR Thermal Camera Watch
A quick hack turns a Flir TG165 Thermal camera into...
eevblog.com
Wave of 100th Birthday Celebrations Rolls Around the World
Following the party Max's family held to celebrate what would...
eetimes.com
Qualcomm Seeking Options Beyond Apple, Samsung
Qualcomm's recent earnings reports suggest significant vulnerabilities. Qualcomm is heavily...
eetimes.com
Elvis Sees All in Russia
A Russian company claims it has the first Russian designed...
eetimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +