Quantcast SATURABLE-CORE REACTOR - 14180_135

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
3-47 Figure 3-31.—Magnetization and permeability curves. You have now seen how a change in the magnetizing force causes a change in permeability. The next question is, how do you change the magnetizing force? Magnetizing force is a function of AMPERE-TURNS. (An ampere-turn is the magnetomotive force developed by 1 ampere of current flowing in a coil of one turn.) If you increase the ampere-turns of a coil, the magnetizing force increases. Since it is not practical to increase the number of turns, the easiest way to accomplish this is to increase the current through the coil. If you increase the current through a coil, you increase the ampere-turns. By increasing the ampere- turns you increase the magnetizing force. At some point, this causes a decrease in the permeability of the core. With the permeability of the core decreased, the inductance of the coil decreases. As said before, a decrease in the inductance causes an increase in power through the load. A device that uses this arrangement is called a SATURABLE-CORE REACTOR or SATURABLE REACTOR. SATURABLE-CORE REACTOR A saturable-core reactor is a magnetic-core reactor (coil) whose reactance is controlled by changing the permeability of the core. The permeability of the core is changed by varying a unidirectional flux (flux in one direction) through the core. Figure 3-32 shows a saturable-core reactor that is used to control the intensity of a lamp. Notice that two coils are wound around a single core. The coil on the left is connected to a rheostat and a battery. This coil is called the control coil because it is part of the control circuit. The coil on the right is connected to a lamp (the load) and an a.c. source. This coil is called the load coil because it is part of the load circuit. As the wiper (the movable connection) of the rheostat is moved toward the right, there is less resistance in the control circuit. With less resistance, the control-circuit current increases. This causes the amount of magnetism in the core to increase and the inductance of the coil in the load circuit to decrease (because the core is common to both coils). With less inductance in the load circuit, load current increases and the lamp gets brighter.


Electrical News
Pi in the Sky Over New York
Residents of the five boroughs (and even that far away...
eetimes.com
Tesla Gets Its First Android Wear Smartwatch App
The car of the future, Tesla, just got even cooler...
eetimes.com
IBM Breaks EUV Throughput Record
An ASML NXE3300B extreme ultraviolet scanner exposed 637 wafers in...
eetimes.com
Fist Bumps & the Zombie Apocalypse
A fist bump transmits about 1/20th of the pathogens as...
eetimes.com
Google Opens Google Glass Basecamps
Google has set up three basecamps to help long-term Explorers,...
eetimes.com
25G Ethernet Looks Back to Future
The chairman of the group that set 40 and 100...
eetimes.com
Introducing FPGA-Based Acceleration for High-Frequency Trading
Handling market data is of highest merit and demands the...
eetimes.com
GM's Powermat Deal Falls Short
General Motors recently announced that it will include multimode wireless...
eetimes.com
Repurposing an FM Radio Chip for an RC Submarine Receiver Project
Adam is currently working on a 75MHz receiver for his...
eetimes.com
IoT Spec Taps Internet Protocol
The IPSO Alliance will release a reference architecture for an...
eetimes.com
Micron Makes Monolithic 8GB DDR3
Using a 25 nm manufacturing process, Micron has created a...
eetimes.com
Memory System Design Methods
Are you working with DDR4? Interested in NVDIMMs? Designing at...
eetimes.com
Makimoto's Wave Revisited for Multicore SoC Design
So predictable was the cycle of standardization and customization in...
eetimes.com
Mobile Benchmarks Need Work
The industry needs to put more effort into building better...
eetimes.com
EEVblog #645 – TRS-80 Model I Retro Computer Teardown
Dave looks inside the most popular microcomputer of the 1970′s,...
eevblog.com
Wearables Sing in Smart Clothes
The future of mainstream wearable technology may be driven by...
eetimes.com
ST Opens MEMS Microphone Test Laboratory
STMicroelectronics NV has set up an anechoic chamber in Taipei,...
eetimes.com
Power Tip 73: Synchronizing Makes for Well-Behaved Power Supplies
Synchronizing your power system offers a number of benefits, including...
eetimes.com
7 Insurance Issues With Your Self-Driving Car
People talk about the significant reduction in automotive insurance rates...
eetimes.com
Microsemi Bolsters FPGA Stance With Mingoa Acquisition
The Mingoa deal demonstrates Microsemi's push to gain market share...
eetimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +