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2-10 WARNING Some rubber tapes are made for special applications. These types are semiconducting and will pass electrical current, which presents a shock hazard. These types of tape are packaged similar to the latex rubber tape. Care should be taken to insulate splices only with latex rubber insulating tape. Friction Tape Putting rubber tape over the splice means that the insulation has been restored to a great degree. It is also necessary to restore the protective covering. Friction tape is used for this purpose. It also provides a minor degree of electrical insulation. Friction tape is a cotton cloth that has been treated with a sticky rubber compound. It comes in rolls similar to rubber tape except that no paper or cloth separator is used. Friction tape is applied like rubber tape; however, it does not stretch. The friction tape should be started slightly back on the original insulation. Wind the tape so that each turn overlaps the one before it. Extend the tape over onto the insulation at the other end of the splice. From this point, a second layer is wound back along the splice until the original starting point is reached. Cutting the tape and firmly pressing down the ends completes the job. When proper care is taken, the splice and insulation can take as much abuse as the rest of the original wire. Plastic Electrical Tape Plastic electrical tape has come into wide use in recent years. It has certain advantages over rubber and friction tape. For example, it can withstand higher voltages for a given thickness. Single thin layers of certain plastic tape will withstand several thousand volts without breaking down. However, to provide an extra margin of safety, several layers are usually wound over the splice. The extra layers of thin tape add very little bulk. The additional layers of plastic tape provide the added protection normally furnished by friction tape. Plastic electrical tape usually has a certain amount of stretch so that it easily conforms to the contour of the splice. Q9. Which of the splices discussed is NOT a butted splice? Q10. Why is friction tape used in splicing? TERMINAL LUGS Since most cable wires are stranded, it is necessary to use terminal lugs to hold the strands together to aid in fastening the wires to terminal studs (see figure 2-11). The terminals used in electrical wiring are either of the soldered or crimped type. Terminals used in repair work must be of the size and type specified on the electrical wiring diagram for the particular equipment.


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