Quantcast Friction Tape

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
2-10 WARNING Some rubber tapes are made for special applications. These types are semiconducting and will pass electrical current, which presents a shock hazard. These types of tape are packaged similar to the latex rubber tape. Care should be taken to insulate splices only with latex rubber insulating tape. Friction Tape Putting rubber tape over the splice means that the insulation has been restored to a great degree. It is also necessary to restore the protective covering. Friction tape is used for this purpose. It also provides a minor degree of electrical insulation. Friction tape is a cotton cloth that has been treated with a sticky rubber compound. It comes in rolls similar to rubber tape except that no paper or cloth separator is used. Friction tape is applied like rubber tape; however, it does not stretch. The friction tape should be started slightly back on the original insulation. Wind the tape so that each turn overlaps the one before it. Extend the tape over onto the insulation at the other end of the splice. From this point, a second layer is wound back along the splice until the original starting point is reached. Cutting the tape and firmly pressing down the ends completes the job. When proper care is taken, the splice and insulation can take as much abuse as the rest of the original wire. Plastic Electrical Tape Plastic electrical tape has come into wide use in recent years. It has certain advantages over rubber and friction tape. For example, it can withstand higher voltages for a given thickness. Single thin layers of certain plastic tape will withstand several thousand volts without breaking down. However, to provide an extra margin of safety, several layers are usually wound over the splice. The extra layers of thin tape add very little bulk. The additional layers of plastic tape provide the added protection normally furnished by friction tape. Plastic electrical tape usually has a certain amount of stretch so that it easily conforms to the contour of the splice. Q9. Which of the splices discussed is NOT a butted splice? Q10. Why is friction tape used in splicing? TERMINAL LUGS Since most cable wires are stranded, it is necessary to use terminal lugs to hold the strands together to aid in fastening the wires to terminal studs (see figure 2-11). The terminals used in electrical wiring are either of the soldered or crimped type. Terminals used in repair work must be of the size and type specified on the electrical wiring diagram for the particular equipment.


Electrical News
Your Part in the Recovery
Engineers and innovators are central to the slow but ongoing...
eetimes.com
Motor Controllers Offer Improved Noise Immunity
Operating at 5V gives these digital signal controllers enhanced noise...
eetimes.com
NXP to Pick Up Its Missing IoT Link - Bluetooth Low Energy
In pursuit of the Internet of Things market, NXP Semiconductors...
eetimes.com
USB Oscilloscopes Get Beta Drivers for Open-Source Hardware
Pico Technology has released beta versions of drivers for BeagleBoneBlack...
eetimes.com
It's Alive! The 3D Printing of Living Tissues
Within a generation, we likely will not just hear of...
eetimes.com
Curiosity Killed the Cat (Just Call Me Mr. Curiosity)
Max desperately needs a cat deterrent, but how should this...
eetimes.com
Memory Design Articles: Diagnostics, Datacenters & Failures
Here's a roundup of recent design articles that are relevant...
eetimes.com
Megachips to Launch DSP-Based Sensor Fusion IC
The growing sensor-fusion controller market for smartphones and wearable devices...
eetimes.com
MediaTek Plans $49 Million Investment in China's Chip Fund
Taiwan's largest chip designer has announced it will invest $48.9...
eetimes.com
Reduce Noise When Making M-PHY Measurements
To make useful measurements on M-PHY Gear 3, you need...
eetimes.com
EEVblog #686 – Mailbag
A monster sized high definition 50fps Mailbag, with two special...
eevblog.com
Startup to Open Source Parallel CPU
Rex Computing plans a parallel processor that could deliver a...
eetimes.com
OCZ Cuts Into Read-Intensive SSD Segment
The SATA-based Saber 1000 Series is yet another option in...
eetimes.com
Infotainment Systems Drive Automotive SSD Adoption
In-vehicle entertainment and navigation systems are becoming more mainstream and...
eetimes.com
Scaling Up Text Rendering on Scaled-Down Devices
The need to support a widening range of languages and...
eetimes.com
What Is Design-to-Cost & Why Does It Matter?
Design-to-Cost should be part of your design process. With a...
eetimes.com
Can Japan Get Her Groove Back With IoT?
Japan once looked like a world leader in smart home...
eetimes.com
The 10 Commandments of Electronics
Although these 'commandments' are presented in a humorous manner, they...
eetimes.com
Broadband Demand Hits the High Seas
Cruise ship operators Royal Caribbean and Carnival are exploring new...
eetimes.com
Anritsu ShockLine VNAs Receive Frost & Sullivan Award
Its line of "faceless" VNA used for production RF T&M...
eetimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +