Quantcast Friction Tape

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
2-10 WARNING Some rubber tapes are made for special applications. These types are semiconducting and will pass electrical current, which presents a shock hazard. These types of tape are packaged similar to the latex rubber tape. Care should be taken to insulate splices only with latex rubber insulating tape. Friction Tape Putting rubber tape over the splice means that the insulation has been restored to a great degree. It is also necessary to restore the protective covering. Friction tape is used for this purpose. It also provides a minor degree of electrical insulation. Friction tape is a cotton cloth that has been treated with a sticky rubber compound. It comes in rolls similar to rubber tape except that no paper or cloth separator is used. Friction tape is applied like rubber tape; however, it does not stretch. The friction tape should be started slightly back on the original insulation. Wind the tape so that each turn overlaps the one before it. Extend the tape over onto the insulation at the other end of the splice. From this point, a second layer is wound back along the splice until the original starting point is reached. Cutting the tape and firmly pressing down the ends completes the job. When proper care is taken, the splice and insulation can take as much abuse as the rest of the original wire. Plastic Electrical Tape Plastic electrical tape has come into wide use in recent years. It has certain advantages over rubber and friction tape. For example, it can withstand higher voltages for a given thickness. Single thin layers of certain plastic tape will withstand several thousand volts without breaking down. However, to provide an extra margin of safety, several layers are usually wound over the splice. The extra layers of thin tape add very little bulk. The additional layers of plastic tape provide the added protection normally furnished by friction tape. Plastic electrical tape usually has a certain amount of stretch so that it easily conforms to the contour of the splice. Q9. Which of the splices discussed is NOT a butted splice? Q10. Why is friction tape used in splicing? TERMINAL LUGS Since most cable wires are stranded, it is necessary to use terminal lugs to hold the strands together to aid in fastening the wires to terminal studs (see figure 2-11). The terminals used in electrical wiring are either of the soldered or crimped type. Terminals used in repair work must be of the size and type specified on the electrical wiring diagram for the particular equipment.


Electrical News
Whisper Shouts Flexibility Sacrificed in Pursuit of Volume
Imagination is moving away from software defined radio and back...
eetimes.com
EEVblog #647 – Agilent 53131A Frequency Counter Oven Upgrade
Dave upgrades his HP/Agilent 53131A frequency counter with an ovenised...
eevblog.com
EUV Results Bogus, Says Analyst
A veteran industry watcher and an IBM expert are at...
eetimes.com
PCIe Disk Drive Needs New Tests?
On the edge of deployment, it's time to create a...
eetimes.com
Has Sharp Dug Itself Out?
Helped by demand for small and midsized LCD panels, Sharp...
eetimes.com
The Coming Revolution in Desktop Pick-and-Place Machines
In the case of today's super-small components, hobbyists desperately need...
eetimes.com
Emulation: Have It Your Way
'Have it your way' sounds like just the right strategy...
eetimes.com
Keysight Technologies Opens Its Doors
The former Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent Technologies has officially...
eetimes.com
Engineers Solve Analog/Digital Problem, Invent Creative Expletives
An analog engineer and a digital engineer join forces, use...
eetimes.com
Friday Quiz: EMC & ESD
Get your EMC/ESD head in gear for the 2014 EMC...
eetimes.com
Is Tesla's Gigafactory a Gigablunder for Panasonic?
Panasonic signed a deal with Tesla on a large-scale battery...
eetimes.com
Android, China Rise in Smartphones
Nearly 300 million smartphones shipped worldwide during the second quarter...
eetimes.com
Movidius Vision Processing Unit Enters 2nd Generation
Movidius announces a new chip and lays claim to the...
eetimes.com
Q'comm Shares a Wearable Strategy
The future of ubiquitous wearables will require more innovation than...
eetimes.com
3D Printing in Space
Among the technological advances that will make our dreams of...
eetimes.com
Sony, Panasonic, Japan Display Plan OLED Joint Venture
Sony Corp., Panasonic Corp., and Japan Display Inc. are working...
eetimes.com
Sony, TSMC Win Award for Silicon-Plastic Process Development
Sony and TSMC's paper describing a process to integrate a...
eetimes.com
What's the Best Traveling Toolkit?
When one is travelling, it can be really handy to...
eetimes.com
Power Week: Google's $1M Power Inverter Challenge - How Small Is Possible?
This week, Google, along with the IEEE, is offering a...
eetimes.com
Teardown: Oculus Rift Dev Kit 2 by iFixit
Using a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 display, Oculus Rift DK2...
eetimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +