Quantcast Figure 3-13.Measuring circuit resistance with an ohmmeter.

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3-19 After you have adjusted the ohmmeter for zero reading, it is ready to be connected to a circuit to measure resistance. A typical circuit and ohmmeter arrangement is shown in figure 3-13. You must ensure that the power switch of the circuit to be measured is in the de-energized (OFF) position. This prevents the source voltage of the circuit from being applied to the meter, a condition that could cause severe damage to the meter movement. Figure 3-13.—Measuring circuit resistance with an ohmmeter. Remember that the ohmmeter is an open circuit when the test leads are separated. To take a resistance reading with a meter, you must provide a path for current flow produced by the meter’s battery. In view A of figure 3-13, the meter is connected at points A and B to produce this path. Connecting these test leads places resistors R1 and R2 in series with the resistance of the meter coil, the zero-adjust potentiometer, and the series multiplying resistor. Since you previously calibrated the meter, the amount of coil movement now depends only on the resistances of R1 and R2. The addition of R1 and R2 into the meter circuit raises the total series resistance and decreases the current. This decreases the amount of pointer deflection. The pointer comes to rest at a scale reading that indicates the combined resistance of R1 and R2. If you were to replace either R1 or R2, or both, with a resistor having a larger ohmic value, the current flow in the moving coil of the meter would be decreased even more. This would further decrease the pointer deflection, and the scale indication would read a still higher circuit resistance. View B is a simplified version of the circuitry in view A. From our ohmmeter discussion, two facts should be apparent: (1) Movement of the moving coil is proportional to the amount of current flow, and (2) the scale reading of the ohmmeter is inversely proportional to current flow in the moving coil. The amount of circuit resistance to be measured may vary over a wide range. In some cases, it may only be a few ohms; in other cases, it may be as great as 1 megohm. Scale multiplication features are built into most ohmmeters so that they will indicate any ohmic value being measured and offer the least amount of error. Most ohmmeters are equipped with a selector switch for selecting the multiplication scale desired. For example, view A of figure 3-14 shows a typical meter that has a six-position switch. The positions are marked on the meter in multiples of 10, from R 1 through R 100K.


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